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False Accusations: The Difference between Digging the Truth and Validating an Allegation

In child molestation cases, there is a very fine line that separates truth from fabrication. In reality, this line is very difficult to identify because it is very atypical, if not impossible to find people who can see it. What we mean is that it is very difficult to find a detective, agent, investigator, or police officer in the United States who has advanced training skills in conducting and handling child molestation cases and interviews.

 

The crime itself is new compared to the more prevalent and heinous offenses. The rise of child molestation cases in the country is attributed much to the growing number of false accusations made by children whom we originally conceive as someone who does not know how to lie.

 

Now we come to this point of discussing the difference between truth and fabrication in order to address the question, why do many alleged child victims lie? To answer this, we have to take a look at the standard and common methods of police interview and investigation.

 

Because of the lack of proper training, a typical investigator instantly leans towards validating an allegation rather than digging the truth.QuotationBecause of the lack of proper training, a typical investigator instantly leans towards validating an allegation rather than digging the truth.Quotation
The usual scenario is that the more frequently the child tells his story, the more it expands and the more the details become inconsistent. The fact is that an investigator believes that the child has been molested because the child said it.

 

When a child is asked, “did your father touch you?” A “yes” answer is the start of an allegation. Once the alleged victim commits to it, there’s no turning back. She instantly creates fresh attention just by telling police that her dad molested her. But the most common problem for this is that the accused may actually be innocent and just because of the leading and suggestive questions of the investigator, the child is led to giving an answer implicating the accused.

 

Because the alleged child victim gets a significant amount of attention, she starts to see it as something she can’t back out from. So, she makes additional allegations and may even go to the extent of including others as “victims” of the accused. The bottom line is she continuously adds another false accusation to an already outrageous story of lies.

 

The main issue here is that many, if not all child molestation and abuse investigators lean towards the alleged child victim’s side even though there is no physical evidence to charge the person accused. When digging for the truth, every question asked to the victim as well as the accused should not be suggestive, coercive, or fabricated.QuotationWhen digging for the truth, every question asked to the victim as well as the accused should not be suggestive, coercive, or fabricated.Quotation
It should be fair and free-flowing – which means that no matter what type of answer the investigator gets, it should not forcibly lead to building a fabricated story of lies and deceit. For so many cases, it is very easy to intimidate or manipulate a child onto telling a lie than defending a person accused of molestation since the norms of society tell us that children don’t lie and when they confess something, it is always true even though most of the circumstances tell otherwise.


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